Categories for Online

How to spot an Influencer and the metrics that matter

February 23, 2017 3:39 pm Published by

Successful Influencer collaborations rely on the way that the brand and the Influencer co-create content.

There are a few things to consider: the Influencers chosen to work with, their audience demographic, and the expectations the brand has on the content and how it performs. These are all important considerations when choosing which Influencers to work with. Here are a few tips to keep in mind.



Brands usually have specific guidelines when it comes to their own image and the content around it. As much as Influencers should be given the freedom to express their own creativity there are still elements of content that should speak to the value and personality of the brand. This is so that the audience feels like they are still experiencing authentic content from a creator they trust, as well as engaging with the brand. You wouldn’t expect Mike Tyson to promote red lipstick from Rimmel. It just wouldn’t seem authentic. So, it is important to choose Influencers whose creative style and content are more or less in line with your brand.



The other reason it is unlikely to see Tyson promoting a lipstick brand is because the majority of his audience would not be interested in lipstick. For content to perform well it needs to be served to the audience who are likely to consume it. Looking for Influencers who speak to a specific audience can open up a whole new world of options. For example, if you wanted to sell lipstick you would look for Influencers who spoke to impassioned users of lipstick. You could go with the obvious and choose a makeup and beauty star to review the lipstick. Or you could choose someone like George Clooney who has an audience primarily of women between the ages of 35 and 60 and get creative with the content. Often Influencers can be found with an engaged and targeted audience who are not necessarily celebrities. The point is that they are well known to a specific audience. Making sure the Influencer’s audiences are also your consumers is vital.


So how do you find Influencers who are already relevant to your brands’ audience?

When looking for Influencers, use keyword searches and get creative.

When looking for an Influencer for Adidas, don’t just search “Adidas”. Dig deeper to find the gems. Try search terms like, “parkour”, “The Weekend” (He is their current face), “running” etc.

Broaden the scope. What does your brand’s audience love to do? Are they travelers? Are they business people? Are they moms? Then consider what they love. People talk about what they love. If you can find an Influencer who loves the things your brand provides, a perfect union is created.


There are 6 primary Influencer archetypes; all of which will be valuable to an Influencer campaign depending on the brands objective.


The Celebrity:

These Influencers have a mega following and are generally well known by the public either in their local community or internationally. The Celebrity plays a role in influencing public opinion. If brand awareness is the objective of your brands campaign, then including Celebrities can definitely help achieve that. In addition, the Celeb is also a great driver of traffic and link clicks. Brands should consider collaborating with Celebrities if they are looking to drive audiences to a product page or website. Spotting a celebrity in the wild is as easy as turning on the TV or reading the news.


The Agitator

Well known for having strong opinions and generating debates online, the Agitator is a good Influencer to include in a strategy when looking to target a specific audience and swing opinion. Agitators generally drive high engagement and responses from their audience. They are able to generate high conversions to public pages but are also strong when it comes to amplifying a message. You can spot an Agitator in the wild by their unique tone, and by the way, they command the attention of people.


The Specialist

Having developed a very niche audience in a very focused topic, Specialists are able to add credibility to your brand’s message and drive conversation online. While oftentimes the reach that is gained from collaborating with a Specialist is not so high, their persuasive power is incredibly valuable. Spotting Specialists is not always so easy, as they are quite rare. You can spot them by their use of references and authoritative tone. They will commonly only speak about a specific topic. You should validate their expertise by extended online research, too.


The Activist

These Influencers tend to be passionate about a specific cause and create content with the purpose of driving awareness and conversation around that cause. Collaboration with activists should happen when your brand’s cause and an Influencers cause intersect. For example, if a children’s television brand wants to create a campaign about anti-bullying, they could collaborate with an Activist whose cause is anti-bullying. In this scenario, the brand gains credibility but they also gain high engagement and amplification of their message.  Activists can be identified by the content of their posts. They generally tend to have long conversations on social media and can be spotted by the long comment threads.


The Creator

A visual storyteller with creative skills, the Creator is the perfect Influencer to collaborate with on content creation. Their creatives skills can range from photography to illustration, to origami. Creators have built up audiences who appreciate and value their content. Engagement garnered around the content is usually about the quality of the material shared. Some of the best campaigns have a strategy where a creator teams up with another type of Influencer to create and share the content. Spotting Creators is not often very difficult. Their biggest social channels are typically Instagram, Youtube, and Pinterest. Generally, a creator can be identified by the resolution of their images, and by the estimated time required for them to produce and publish their content.


The Foot Soldier

The main contributing factor of a foot soldier is not a particular strength in creative, or expertise in a specific area, it is their collaborative power to cause content to go viral. Foot soldiers have often been called micro-influencers or “pebbles”. They are essentially influencers who do not have large followings and on their own may not cause much noise. However, if you are able to combine the voice of at least 10 Foot Soldiers, you will find that the volume goes up a couple of notches and you are able to start a movement. Foot Soldiers are the glue of many a successful campaign and possibly the most effective tactic to spread a message.

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Protecting your brand as a blogger and online influencer

October 21, 2015 11:46 am Published by

Protecting your personal brand as a blogger and online influencer

Have you ever Googled your blog’s name? Your brand. It’s important to know what results are returned when people Google your brand. The more info people can get about you by just searching your brand, the better.

There are typically 10 search results on the first page of a Google search, and every single one of those 10 results should point directly to an online property that you manage. Brands, marketers, potential new readers or followers will likely Google your brand at some point. Brands and marketers will Google your brand if they are considering including you in an Influencer Marketing campaign.

How do you dominate the page one of Google with your brand?

It’s not as hard as you think. Most influencers already own multiple branded properties online. A blog, a Facebook page, a Twitter account, Instagram account and YouTube channel etc.   Google Search

All these properties can potentially appear on the first page of search results when your brand is searched. You just have to make sure that Google (and other search engines) understand that your brand owns all those properties.

You have to tell Google where you can be found

Most of these social media profiles have a field where you can link to your website. That is the first and most important step to helping search engines understand that the social media account is part of your brand.

Google now has direct access to Twitter’s data stream. Google can only crawl certain parts of public Facebook pages, and the same applies for Instagram.

For this very reason it’s important that you use the one property that you completely own (your blog) to help Google understand your whole brand and where you can be found online.

Link to your social accounts from your website

You control how much of your website Google (and other search engines) can crawl. You control where you are linking to, and from where on your site.


You control how Google interprets your brand.

You should already be linking to all of your social media profiles for your brand from your website, so that your readers can easily find those profiles.

Your “About” page on your Website is there to give your users all they need to know about you. From here you can easily link to all your social media profiles, not only for your readers, but also to help Google understand that your brand extends to those social media profiles.

But it doesn’t have to stop at your “About” page. You can also use your “Contact” page as an opportunity to help Google understand where you can be reached. Because some of your audience will prefer Twitter as a channel for communication, it would also make sense to inform your audience of all the social channels they can use to contact you.

A Webfluential profile page is a gold mine of info for Google and your audience

Your Webfluential profile page gives a lot of information about your brand and your audience. Things like your audience demographics, links to all your brand social media profiles and also a link to your Website. Google loves pages like a Webfuential profile that provide a lot of information about a search.

By simply linking to your Webfluential Profile page from your website, you will be giving Google a great resource to return relevant information for your brand. So make sure you also link to your Webfluential profile from your “About” page, your “Contact” page and even your “Advertise” page if you have one.

It’s not just about the search results

You are doing a good job with your brand. You have an audience and that audience is still growing. You create cool content for your audience. Now brands and marketers want to start working with you so that they get access to your audience.

The first thing a marketer is going to to do before reaching out to you is Google your brand.

When your brand is searched it’s a sign of a strong brand if you dominate the first page of the Google results by not only showing your blog, but also all your social media profiles and your Webfluential profile.

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How remarketing gives you another chance to close the deal

September 16, 2015 9:59 am Published by

Have you ever browsed the web and felt that whatever website you visit; you see ads from the online store you visited the day before? Whether you are catching up on news on CNN or browsing Facebook pics of a friend’s holiday, ads keep popping up (like magic) with the shoes you decided were not essential. However, this is not the act of your Fairy Godmother waving her wand to ensure you have this seasons latest kicks, but it is rather part of a strategic remarketing campaign.

One of the most crucial questions for any business is “How do I attract more customers?” The corner store wants to increase foot traffic, a steakhouse wants more reservations and the online shoe shop wants to have less abandoned shopping carts. However, in the over-competitive online world, discovering a website may be easy, but leaving it is as simple as clicking a button. The more important business question in this case is “How do I get them to come back?”

Remarketing is used to reach past website visitors or app users. It is a smart way to reach out to people who may not have made an immediate purchase or taken up your call to action on first visit. It gives you the opportunity to reconnect with potential customers by positioning targeted ads in front them when they are browsing elsewhere on the web.

Put simply, one uses marketing to bring a visitor to your website, and when they do not make a purchase, you then use remarketing tactics to bring them back to your website and convert them into paying customers. Remarketing is a great tool to add to your Influencer Marketing campaign. Lets find out why.

Using dynamic remarketing to customise ads

Dynamic remarketing takes things a step further by including products or services that people viewed on your website within the ads. This delivers a customised and more relevant ad to the potential customer. They are more likely to take note of the ad as they recognise the product displayed from their previous browsing or abandoned shopping carts. This connection makes them more likely to buy. Linking back to the shoe example, this would be viewing ads for the green Nike trainers you left abandoned in your shopping cart, whilst browsing other websites.

How does remarketing work?

Remarketing ads can be delivered to a defined audience in both text and image display formats. The ads are managed by Google AdWords and are displayed on web pages visited by your target audience that accept Google advertising placements.

The technology behind remarketing works by placing *cookies that are stored on the visitor’s computer when browsing. Their cookie ID is added to your remarketing list to serve relevant and customised ads.

How successful is remarketing?

The central principle of remarketing is to retain the attention of people that have already expressed an interest in your business. Therefore, for remarketing to be successful you need to ensure that your ad is highly relevant to what your visitors are looking for and that there is some enticement for them to return to your website. For example, perhaps I decide to buy the green Nike trainers as the remarketing ads show me a 10% discount code or offer me a gift certificate on my first purchase.

When used correctly, remarketing is a powerful tool for repeat website traffic, sales conversions or creating brand awareness. This is why remarketing is sometimes referred to as ‘conversion marketing’ and is a great tool for driving return on investment (ROI).

A Google case study, of Loews Hotel Group, showcases how they shifted 70 percent of their offline ad spend to online last year. The hotel group started using remarketing and the overall results were very favourable. Revenue increased 10 percent, bookings went up 9 percent and unique site visitors increased by 5 percent. However, the most impressive number was the $60,000 in sales that the $800 remarketing campaign produced.

Remarketing is believed to be the ultimate tool to address the problem of abandoned shopping carts and increase sales conversions. A study showcased on Selligent found that the return rate of customers that abandon shopping carts without remarketing is 8 percent, but with remarketing the return rate increases to 26 percent.


In an era where our time is continually diverted to something new and we are bombarded with messaging, it is important to remain relevant and at the forefront of a potential customer’s mind. Remarketing allows marketers to strategically target people that have already expressed interest in their business and remind them to purchase the green Nike sneakers they abandoned in their shopping cart. With a little added enticement from a remarketing campaign, 26 percent of those customers will return to purchase the shoes.

*A cookie is a small bit of code that helps a web browser store data about websites.

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